Dr. Gangamma S.

 

Contact address    

 Assistant Professor

Department of Chemical Engineering

National Institute of Technology Karnataka Surathkal

Srinivasanagar P.O.

Surathkal-575 025

gangamma@gmail.com

 

Education

Ph.D.             Environmental Science and Engineering, IIT Bombay

M.Tech.         Environmental Science and Engineering, IIT Bombay

B.E.                 Chemical Engineering, Bangalore University, Karnataka

           

Employment

Visiting Scientist, SDS-TRCRGICD, Bangalore, 2013-2014

Assistant professor, Chemical Engineering, NITK Surathkal, 2007-till date

Senior lecturer, Chemical Engineering, NITK Surathkal, 2004-2007

Lecturer, Chemical Engineering, NITK Surathkal, 1998-2004

Lecturer, Chemical Engineering, REC Hulkoti, 1997-1998

 

Research area

Environmental immunology, Public Health, Air pollution and health, Aerosol science and technology

 

Teaching

Environmental immunology, Cell signaling and Systems biology, Air pollution and Control, Aerosol Science and Technology

Courses developed: Environmental immunology, Environmental and Industrial Epidemiology, Cell signaling and Systems biology.

 

Awards

1) Young scientist award, DST-SERC, Govt of India.2009-2012 ( also awarded excellent grade from the committee).

2)  Rajiv Gandhi national fellowship, Govt of India.2006-2011.

3) Invited as chair for Indoor air 2005, Beijing, China, 2005.

 

Membership

1) Institute of Engineers (IE), India-life membership

2) Indian aerosol science and technology association (IASTA), India-life membership

3) Indian Immunology Society (IIS), India-life membership

 

List of publication in indexed journals:

International Journals:

1) Gangamma S. 2014.Charcterization of airborne bacteria in Mumbai urban city. Science of the Total Environment. Vol.488-489,70.

2) Gangamma S. 2013. Airborne particulate matter and acute lung inflammation.    Environmental Health Perspectives. Vol 121(1),11.

3) Gangamma S. 2012. Airborne particulate matter and innate immunity activation.Environmental Science and Technology. Vol 46(20) 10879.

4) Gangamma S. 2012. Airborne particulate matter associated endotoxin and proinflammatory responses. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Vol 130(4), 1012.

5) Gangamma S, Patil R.S., Mukherji S. 2011. Characterization and proinflammatory response of airborne biological particles from wastewater treatment plants. Environmental Science and Technology. 45:3282-3287.

6) Varghese, S K. and Gangamma S. 2009. Particle deposition in human respiratory system: deposition of concentrated hydroscopic aerosols, Inhalation Toxicology, 2, 1619-630.

7) Varghese, S. K., Gangamma. S. (2007) Sectional model for aerosol dynamics in a laminar flow reactor, Aerosol and Air quality Research, 7(1), 46.

8) Varghese, S. K., Gangamma. S. (2007) Evaporation of water droplets by radiation: effect of absorbing inclusions, Aerosol and Air quality Research, 7(1), 95-105

9) Varghese, S. K., Gangamma. S. (2006) Particle Deposition in Human Respiratory Tract: Effect of Water-Soluble Fraction, Aerosol and Air quality Research,6(4), 360-379.

10) Varghese, S. K., Gangamma. S., Patil, R. S., and Sethi, V. (2005) Particulate respiratory dose to Indian women from domestic cooking, Aerosol Science & Technology, 39(12), 1201-1207.

11) Patil, R. S., Sethi, V., Varghese, S. K., and Gangamma, S. (2005) Personal exposure to Aerosols in urban homes, Bulletin of American Meteorogical Society, 86(9), 1226.

National Journals

1) Gangamma. S., and Varghese, S. K., (2005) Particle deposition studies in experimental chamber and indoor rooms, IASTA Bulletin, 17(1), 162-164

2) Varghese, S. K., and Gangamma. S., (2005) Deposition of semi volatile organic compounds in human respiratory system, IASTA Bulletin. 17(1), 589-590

3) Gangamma. S., Varghese, S. K., Patil, R. S., and Sethi, V. (2004) Monitoring and control of air pollution exposure due to domestic cooking in urban areas, IASTA Bulletin, 16(2), 312-315

 

List of books written

S. Gangamma, Rashmi S. Patil and Virendra Sethi. Indoor air pollution due to domestic cooking in urban households. Environmental Science and Technology in India. Edited by Arvind Kumar and R.K.Somashekar. Daya Publishing House. Delhi, 290-296, 2008.

 

List of papers presented in conferences

1) Gangamma S. Low level endotoxemia not associated with endotoxin tolerance or priming. 40th Annual conference organized by Indian Immunology Society, New Delhi, India, November 15-17, 2013.

2) Gangamma S., Patil, R.S.  Mukherji, S. and Chakravortty, D. (2011) Measurement and characterization of biological activities of ambient particular matter at different locations in Mumbai. 104th Annual conference and exhibition organized by Air & Waste Management Association, Orlando, USA, June 21-23, 2011 (Reference Number: 2011-A-378-AWMA).

3) Gangamma S., Patil, R.S.  Mukherji, S. and Chakravortty, D. (2010) Characteristics and associated health parameters of bioaerosols in Mumbai, India. Envirovision-2010. Organized by Indian environmental association & Indian Institute of Technology Bombay. November 23-26.

Awarded the first prize in poster presentation

4) Varghese, S. K., and Gangamma. S. (2007) Numerical implementation of cloud droplet activation parameterization in large scale models, International symposium on aerosol – chemistry – climate interactions, November 21-23, PRL, Ahmedabad, India.

5) Gangamma. S., Varghese, S. K., Patil, R. S., and Sethi, V. (2005) Effect of natural and forced ventilation systems on decay and deposition rates of particles produced by indoor sources in Indian urban households, Indoor air 2005, September 4-9, Beijing, China.

6) Varghese. S. K., Gangamma. S., Patil, R. S., and Sethi, V. (2005) Mass size distributions of fine particulate matter from cooking and estimation of the deposition in the human respiratory system, Indoor air 2005, September 4-9, Beijing, China.

7) Gangamma. S., and Varghese, S. K., (2005) Particle deposition studies in experimental chamber and indoor rooms, Asian Aerosol Conference 2005, December 13-16, Mumbai, India.

8) Varghese, S. K., and Gangamma. S., (2005) Deposition of semi volatile organic compounds in human respiratory system, Asian Aerosol Conference 2005, December 13-16, Mumbai, India.

9) Gangamma. S., Patil, R. S., Varghese, S. K., and Sethi, V. (2005) Personal Exposure to Women in Urban Households, Indo-Norwegian seminar, IIT Kanpur, June 24-25.

10) Gangamma. S., Varghese, S. K., Patil, R. S., and Sethi, V. (2004) Monitoring and control of indoor air pollution, International Conference on: Aerosols clouds and Indian monsoon, November 15-17, IIT Kanpur.

11) Gangamma. S., Patil, R. S., and Sethi, V. (2004) Indoor air pollution due to domestic cooking in urban households, NHEEI seminar, Bangalore University, Bangalore, November 16-19.

 

Student’s projects supervised

Post-graduates:22 (completed), 7(ongoing)

 

Research Projects

Completed

1) Measurement and characterization of airborne biological particles (2009-2012) -DST, Govt. of India. (“Received Excellent Grade”)- Rs 12.12 lakhs

2) Sampling and analysis techniques for bioaerosols: Standardization and field evaluation for airborne endotoxin (2008-2011)-DST, Govt. of India (With Prof. R.S.Patil, IIT Bombay), Rs 40 lakhs

Ongoing

1) Measurement and Characterization of ambient bioaerosols in Bangalore city (2013-2016). DST, Govt. of India. Rs 53 lakhs

2) Ambient airborne particulate matter: Effect of biological component on lung inflammation (2013-2016). DST, Govt. of India. Rs 51 lakhs

 

Seminars / Workshops organized

1)      Coordinator for the National Workshop on “Trends in Aerosol Research- Climate and Health” from 25-26th November 2005, at Chemical Engineering Department NITK, Surathkal.

2)      Coordinator for the Workshop on “Air Quality Analysis and Water Quality Analysis" from 8- 16th August 2005, at Chemical Engineering Department NITK, Surathkal under TEQIP networking program.

3)      Student coordinator for two days National Conference on “Advances in Environmental Engineering and Science” CESE, IIT Bombay, during  8th and  9th  December 2003.

Invited lecture/talk

1) Exposure and health effects in sewage treatment plants. Environmental Day-2010, Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai.

2) Wastewater treatment plant exposure and health. Delivered lecturer to official of Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai. 20th October 2012.

3) Airborne particulate matter and health: A Case study on wastewater treatment exposure. Talk delivered in three day workshop on “Recent Trends in Monitoring, Control and Abatement of Air Pollution” at NITK Surathkal,26-28th December 2012.

4) Airborne particulate matter and Health: Inflammation and Regulation. Talk delivered at IIT Kanpur on 15th March 2013.

 

Highlights of research

1) Mathematical models for lung deposition

A model for particulate and gas deposition in lung was developed. Deposition of semi-volatile compounds in lung was examined with the model. The results indicate that, depending on volatility, the dosage of semi-volatiles significantly differs from that of non-evaporating particles. The gas phase deposition can be a major path way for volatile and semi-volatile particles in the respiratory system. Behavior of some candidate compound such as nicotine has been explored. These results have important implications in deposition of carcinogenic volatiles from cigarette smoke. Transport of hygroscopic aerosols in the respiratory system is explored through numerical modeling. Many pharmaceutical formulations for in aerosol therapy contain hygroscopic compounds. In nearly saturated lung regions water vapor uptake by these particles could alter their size and modify their deposition efficiencies. These studies in general useful for rational design of nebulizers for aerosol drug delivery.

Related publications

Gangamma S. 2013. Airborne particulate matter induced lung inflammation.    Environmental Health Perspectives.120. http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206061.

Varghese, S K. and Gangamma S. 2009. Particle deposition in human respiratory system: deposition of concentrated hydroscopic aerosols, Inhalation Toxicology, 2, 1619-630.

Varghese, S. K., Gangamma. S. (2007) Sectional model for aerosol dynamics in a laminar flow reactor, Aerosol and Air quality Research, 7(1), 46-44

Varghese, S. K., Gangamma. S. (2006) Particle Deposition in Human Respiratory Tract: Effect of Water-Soluble Fraction, Aerosol and Air quality Research,6(4), 360-379.

Varghese, S. K., Gangamma. S., Patil, R. S., and Sethi, V. (2005) Particulate respiratory dose to Indian women from domestic cooking, Aerosol Science & Technology, 39(12), 1201-1207.

Varghese, S. K., and Gangamma. S., (2005) Deposition of semi volatile organic compounds in human respiratory system, IASTA Bulletin. 17(1), 589-590

 2) Studies on airborne biological particles

Studies in ambient and wastewater treatment plant environment have shown that biological particles are important component of the particulate matter responsible for induction of proinflammatory indicator.  Our studies have indicated that biological components of bacterial origin are of very important in inducing the proinflammatory response. Our studies have demonstrated that bacterial species composition can be used as a marker to track the transport of particles from different sources. The use of biological components in source apportionment of airborne particulate matter is a new method and can be applied in many manmade and natural settings.

Related publications

Gangamma S, Patil RS, Mukherji S. 2011. Characterization and proinflammatory response of airborne biological particles from wastewater treatment plants. Environmental Science and Technology. 45:3282-3287.

Gangamma S. 2014.Charcterization of airborne bacteria in Mumbai urban city. Science of the Total Environment. Vol.488-489,70.

Gangamma S. (2014) Low level endotoxemia and inflammation in wastewater treatment plant workers in India. Manuscript prepared

3) Innate immunity activation by airborne particulate matter     

Variations in physical properties, chemical composition, sources and host susceptibility paint a diverse picture of health effects due to PM exposure. The physical and chemical properties of PM also vary spatially and temporally. Biological components in PM may also have a role in PM associated health effects and brings variability to PM composition. The variability and diversity are considered as reasons behind the poor understanding of PM induced health effects. However, PM induced adverse health effects can be partially understood through innate immune modulation due to PM exposure.

Our studies have demonstrated that PM activates innate immune responses. Blocking of endotoxin receptors such as TLR4 and CD14 demotes TNF-α induced by WWTP PM-10 in WBA. Experiments have shown that Akt involved in WWTP PM induced TNF-α production by THP-1 cells but not WBA. p38 mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitor SB202190 reduced WWTP PM induced TNF-α indicating the role of p38 in PM induced inflammation. Akt inhibitor down regulated the p38 phosphrylation of THP-1 cells stimulated with PM. These results are useful in guiding therapeutic intervention of PM induced inflammation in lung and in circulation.

Related publications

Gangamma S. 2012. Airborne particulate matter and Innate immunity activation.Environmental Science and Technology.DOI:10.1021/es30349j.

Gangamma S. 2014.Charcterization of airborne bacteria in Mumbai urban city. Science of the Total Environment. Vol.488-489,70.

Gangamma S (2014). Innate immunity receptors involved in proinflammatory response of wastewater treatment particulate matter. Manuscript prepared

4) Studies on PM induced tolerance development

Endotoxin tolerance was first described early in 20th century when fever therapy, a process involving the intravenous injection of endotoxin, was used in an attempt to treat diseases. But patients often developed tolerance to the fever-inducing agent, requiring progressively higher doses to generate fever. In other words, previous exposure to endotoxin favors a refractory state for monocytes and macrophages for subsequent endotoxin stimulation. This phenomenon is described as endotoxin tolerance. Understanding this phenomenon is important because endotoxin tolerance has been reported along with increased susceptibility to infections due to PM exposure.  It is suggested that, PM exposure leads to down regulation of innate immunity response (tolerance) that could lead to increased susceptibility to infections. Biological components such as endotoxin associated with PM is thought to be the inducer such tolerance in PM exposed groups. Our study demonstrates that in spite of low level endotoxemia the PM exposed group did not develop endotoxin resistance. This study suggests that endotoxin induced tolerance model need to be further tested.

Gangamma S. (2014) Low level endotoxemia and inflammation in wastewater treatment plant workers in India,Manuscript prepared

Gangamma S. Low level endotoxemia not associated with endotoxin tolerance or priming. 40th Annual conference organized by Indian Immunology Society, New Delhi, India, November 15-17, 2013.

 

Contact us

Hari Mahalingam, Associate Professor and Head
Department of Chemical Engineering, NITK, Surathkal
P. O. Srinivasnagar, Mangalore - 575 025
Karnataka, India.

  • Hot line: +91-0824-2474057

Connect with us

We're on Social Networks. Follow us & get in touch.